Market The Experience

Driving down one of our wonderfully congested streets in LA, I was struck by the billboard pasted below.  It reminded me that in the live business we never market the experience, just the show itself.  If we changed this, we would sell more tickets.

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The above ad from Pom Wonderful does not tout the great taste of the beverage, its calorie count, unique color, or any of its other characteristics that could set it apart from its competitors.  Instead, Pom grabs you with a headline, Cheat death… and a noose.  Pretty easy message to understand.

On your next tour, show, event, whatever, try marketing the experience rather than the show.  If you are a concert promoter and have the band moe. coming through, try monitoring fan sites and chat rooms to see how they describe the act’s shows…and then market that.  If you produce family entertainment or sports, push the bond parents can make with their children rather than the opportunity to see “so and so Live”.

Over the years, I’ve written many times about my concert experiences growing up at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, NY.  It would start with meeting up at a friend’s house.  This way we could caravan up and park next to each other for tailgating.  Driving I-87 North or South (depending on where you live in that part of upstate NY) you would see all the other cars, vans and pickups headed to the same place you were.  Sometimes it would be as obvious as a carload of people and a sign in their window that said “ ____ or bust”.  Other times it would be something simple like a beat-up Trans-Am (hey I did say upstate NY) driving next to you  blaring the latest album from the artist you are going to see, on a  stereo worth more than their whole car.

Once at the show, walking around and people watching was the thing to do.  That and marshmallow fights.  At dusk, the opening act would usually hit the stage.  Most of the audience were trickling into the venue by now, but not always paying attention to the band.  Finally at 9:30 pm; house lights would dim, stage work lights would go out, and with much anticipation in the air the artist that everyone had come to see would light-up the crowd.  You sang every word to every song and didn’t leave until the house music came up and the blinding light of reality signaled the march back to your car.

Describe that when marketing your next live event.  How is the show going to make your audience feel?  What will the experience be like?  Why should they pay money to go?  It has been said a million times… “Sell the sizzle not the steak.”  Most purchases are based on an emotional response.  What could be better than hanging with your best friends, watching your favorite live attraction with people who are sharing in your excitement!  Market that to fans and watch the tickets start selling.

Talk to you soon…

Jim

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